• August 18, 2020

     

    Dear Parent,

    I am excited to start a new year and see all of my friends again. This year is going to be strange and different for everyone. Mistakes will be made and we will learn from them. We will work together as a team and make it the best year. 

    You are an amazing parent/guardian for your child! You know your child better than anyone else. You know their stamina and strengths. If any of the details of the tasks that I have suggested are too difficult for your child, you can modify or even skip parts of the assignment so that your child has fun with language. The most important part of this home activity is to continue working with language. I am a reading teacher, but we work on oral language such as speaking and listening as well as reading and writing.

    I hope we can be together soon!

    Sherri Skoog

     

     

     

     

    May 26, 2020

     

    Summer Reading BINGO!

    Dear Students,

    You have worked so hard on your reading this school year! Remember to keep practicing this summer by reading books that you enjoy! To help motivate you to do some reading, I’ve included a Summer Reading BINGO sheet. Keep this all summer and fill it out as you complete the various activities. Bring it back to me in the fall to win some prizes! Special prizes will be awarded for getting a BINGO for one line completed, two lines completed, three lines completed, and getting a BLACKOUT!

    Every time you complete an activity, have a parent initial the box. Keep this somewhere safe and bring it back to school in the fall.

    I know this school year is not ending like we had hoped. I have missed working with all of you SO MUCH!! I hope you have a wonderful summer of playing outside, spending time with your family, and of course….READING!!!    I look forward to seeing you in the fall when school starts!

    Have a great summer!!

    Love,

    Mrs. Skoog

     

    Summer Bingo    

     

    Sing A Long

     

    May 18, 2020

     

    Good morning,

     

    I hope you all are doing well. 

     

    Songs are a fun way to read with your child! 

     

    I am sending a recording of a sing-a-long that my husband and I did. It is about pets, and if this is too sensitive of a subject for your family right now, feel free not to listen to it with your child. 

     

    Please stay safe,

     

    Sherri Skoog



    Click on the link to hear the song:

     

    Pets Are Great

     

    Pets are great

     

    But they all have 

     

    Needs, needs.

     

    Dogs and cats 

     

    Need shelter 

     

    And songbirds must have seed.

     

    Mommy, Daddy,

     

    Please,

     

    Get a pet for me.

     

    I am old enough to have

     

    Responsibility.



    I printed out the words in case you wanted to sing them with your child without us. After you sing the song with your child, you can discuss the meanings of the following words:  responsibility, shelter, and needs.

     

     

    BINGO!

     

    Lesson Plan May 4 - May 8

     

    Good morning,

    I hope this communication finds you all well. I miss you. I wish you all the best during this crazy period. If you or your family are in need of anything, please reach out.

    You are an amazing parent/guardian for your child! You know your child better than anyone else. You know their stamina and strengths. If any of the details of the tasks that I have suggested are too difficult for your child, you can modify or even skip parts of the assignment so that your child has fun with language while they are at home. The most important part of this home activity is to continue working with language. I am a reading teacher, but we work on oral language such as speaking and listening as well as reading and writing. Each of those aspects are included in this lesson.  

    This lesson should last about a week, but if you enjoy it, feel free to extend it. If you can, work on this activity for 15-20 minutes every day. And, as I said, feel free to modify it. 

    Thank you for your patience during this trying time. We will get through this together,

    Mrs. Skoog 

     

    BINGO

     

    Lesson Plan May 4 - May 8

     

    Reading Bingo

     

    Make a list of your favorite story characters.  Put their names in alphabetical order.

     

    Write a letter to Mrs. Skoog.  Tell me what you have been doing at home.

     

    Turn off all of the lights in your room and read a book with a flashlight.

     

    Visit

    Scholastic Learn at Home Link.  

    Click on GRADES 1&2, WEEK 4, DAY 17: ANIMAL STUDIES-SQUIRRELS.

    Watch/listen to the stories and then tell me 2 interesting facts you learned about squirrels.






    FREE SPACE

     

    Search in your book for 5 words that have consonant blends.  They can be beginning or ending consonant blends.

    (beginning blend examples: st-, sk-, cr, gr, bl-, br-)

    (ending blend examples: -st, -lf, -nt, -sk)



    Draw a picture of a character from a story you read.  Write down two details telling me more about the character.




    Read a book on a blanket in the grass 

    (read inside if it’s not nice weather).

    Visit

    Scholastic Learn at Home Link.  

    Click on GRADES 1&2, WEEK 4, DAY 16: ANIMALS & PLANTS-SEASHORE HABITAT

    Watch/listen to the stories and then tell me 2 interesting facts you learned about the animals and their homes.

     

     

     

    TALENT SHOW

    April 27 - May 1

     

    In the midst of physical distancing, a great way to bring a community together is to have a talent show via Zoom or some other video conferencing tool. As humans we still need social interaction even if we have to be physically distant. A talent show is all about community members building the confidence of performers through cheering and clapping. 

     

    Here is a great book to read before your show: The Scrambled States of America Talent Show, by Laurie Keller. Within the book, Georgia has stage fright before performing in a talent show. While I read the book, I noticed a state was misspelled. For fun, see if you can spot which state. 

     

    Artists and performers often write about what each piece of artwork means. You can have them choose their performance and write about it. They can practice reading it aloud until they are satisfied with how it sounds. Then read it to the audience while the camera is focused on the artwork itself or before they begin their performance. Please videotape and send their performance via email to me if possible.

     

    Here are the steps to a great talent show.

     

    1. Brainstorm ideas - You don’t have to be a great singer or piano player to be in a talent show. We each have our own talents. Help your child develop a list of potential acts that they could perform for their audience. The following are a few ideas, but they can choose their own.

     

    Ideas for Performances:

     

    • Art Exhibition - I am sure at this point your child has accrued quite a portfolio of artwork. They will be thrilled to have their artwork further appreciated.  Now is the time to let their communication skills shine. Let them explain each one to their audience. 

     

    • Contortionist - Every child loves to show how much they can contort their bodies! Let them first explain to the audience what they will be seeing, and then let them strike a pose (or poses) with everyone watching! Don’t let them practice something that would hurt them, though because everyone should stay out of the hospital right now. My daughter is a nurse at a local ICU, and she told me I had better not fall because it is not a good time to go to the hospital. 

     

    • Lip Sync, Poetry Slam or Sing a Song: This will give your child an opportunity to read and memorize rhythmical passages in order to perform. While they are working on rhythm they are practicing fluency to perfect their performance.

     

    • Interactive Read Aloud - Help your child to make reading a picture book a social experience. Let them explore the amazing art and deep meanings within many picture books to choose the one they want to read for the talent show. This is really an opportunity for your child to perform the book. They can create various voices for each of the characters and begin to anticipate laughter or questions from their audience. 

     

    1. Create Advertisements - They can draw and label posters advertising their acts in the talent show such as, “Watch Jane Doe perform her famous Magic Acts at 5:30 via Zoom!” Then you can help them put it on social media such as Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, or just email or text.

     

    1. Teach them how to be a Good Audience Member - Explain to them that audience members are willing to be captivated, and are very forgiving of mistakes. Laughing, cheering or clapping at appropriate places is highly encouraged.

     

    Have fun with this! I have been amazed at how Zoom and Google Meet can be a great interactive audience!

     

    Sherri Skoog

    Interventionist

     

    Earth Day

    4/20/19

     

    A Message to My Parents, 

     

    Earth Day is this week. I love to celebrate this with my students. We usually sit outside and listen to the Spring Peepers by the pond as we discuss it and then create a story or journal about it. This is usually a weeklong project, and one of my favorites.

     

    I am longing to see my students, and share this experience with them. Someday soon things will get back to some sort of normal.

     

    Until then, thank you for being patient as this plays out. 

     

    I hope you are all well and safe, and if you need anything, please do not hesitate to contact myself or the school,

     

    Mrs. Skoog



    Earth Day Lesson

    4/20/19

     

    Wednesday, April 22nd is Earth Day. The annual celebration was created in 1970 to inspire appreciation for protecting the health of the environment. This is a great reason to get outside, if you can. I know we can probably all enjoy a little fresh air and sunshine. Hopefully, the weather is cooperating this week.

     

    Kids are experts at playing with nature. Here are some ideas to get you started, but I strongly encourage you to use these as a jumping off point and begin to create your own nature infused adventure.

    • Sky Visioning
      A simple nature practice you can do even in the most urban environment. Go outside, look at the sky. You can do this standing, sitting or laying down. Experiment with perspective, contemplate the infinite, use the sky as a backdrop for some vision work, or simply enjoy the color and immensity of the sky.
    • Peeling Back the Man-Made
      This is an imagination practice you can do anywhere, anytime. First you look around at your environment. Then, in your mind’s eye, begin to “peel away” the man-made to get a glimpse at the natural world that has been lying underneath all along. Stay awake to insights. You can do this from inside a building or a car.
    • Meandering
      Go outside and wander until your child sees something natural (big or small) that catches their interest. Sidle over and check out that natural thing that caught their eye. Stay with it for a second, touch it if you want, breathe and allow insights to arise. Then, when you feel ready, wander on until some new natural thing catches your attention. 
    • Sensing a Thing for the First Time
      Tell your child to pretend to be an alien from outer space. Have them choose something natural. It can be something very simple, like a leaf or a grape or a birdsong. Explore it, see it, touch it, hear, taste, smell it for the very first time. This exercise can be done in less than a minute, but it can transform the rest of your day.
    • Open Yourself to the Possibility that Nature Knows You Are There
      Go out into nature and wander until you find a safe place to rest. You may stand or sit. Once you settle into that spot, tell your child to imagine that the natural world around you knows you are there. Imagine the earth and the plants and animals and even the rocks, water and air know you are there. Open all your senses and see what they have to tell you.

    Once you are finished with your adventure, discuss it. Encourage your child to use all of their senses to describe their adventure. They can draw a picture or make a poster and describe why it is important to be thankful for the natural world and how we should take care of it. 

    If the weather does not cooperate, here are a few up close looks at 5 National Parks. 

    Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska

    Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

    Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

    Bryce Canyons National Park, Utah

    Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida

     

    Also here are a few books about Earth Day for your child to enjoy.

     

    This is the Nest That Robin Built, by Denise Fleming

     

    A Stone Sat Still, by Brendan Wenzel

     

    It’s Earth Day, by Mercer Mayer

     

    The Lorax, by Dr. Seuss

     

     

    April 13, 2020

     

    Good morning,

     

    I hope you enjoyed your day off on Friday, and some of the sunshine that finally came through. I also hope that everyone in your family is healthy and safe.

     

    You are an amazing parent/guardian for your child! You know your child better than anyone else. You know their stamina and strengths. If any of the details of the tasks that I have suggested are too difficult for your child, you can modify or even skip parts of the assignment so that your child has fun with language while they are at home. The most important part of this home activity is to continue working with language. I am a reading teacher, but we work on oral language such as speaking and listening as well as reading and writing. Each of those aspects are included in this lesson.  

     

    This lesson should last about a week, but if you enjoy it, feel free to extend it. If you can, work on this activity for 15 - 20 minutes every day. And, as I said, feel free to modify it. 

     

    Please let me know if you or your family need anything. I will help however I can,

     

    Mrs. Skoog

     

    Lesson Plan April 13th - 17th

     

    Family Tree/Story

     

    Creating a family tree is a great way to discover and preserve your family’s unique history. This may take some time and energy, but creating an heirloom that the family can share forever will be well worth it in the end.

    You can read, “Me and My Family Tree,” by Joan Sweeney.

    • Appropriate for any age with modifications

     

    https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-T1s_SYPP9KkH-LKpVjatj4z5Az-__78KszIt1K99HKkPDssGrKuv28FTdc5Q0dLojmM2rbt5vz_NQ3SWa4_Sacgu7Nq0KKLQ3SUZBltCBB3UErXP4ASyTeGjjzxciaLKfGdGdKqhttps://lh6.googleusercontent.com/L0MAItgCh_x2lnJmihBaGsDj1nUR7juWpWX9K6gYY_jCh9YQqR1JmuVPayeofoOv9taeuDCRkaxSJCHMgrgEfdca15ToNDFVCiqWVTKrVzVC5b2NtJflInikLFV8XD6kEBHyX8oW

     

     

     

    Directions:

     

    Step 1: Discuss your child’s name. Explain that their last name means that they belong to that family. Share with them other people in the family who might have that same last name. Have them help you draw a Family Tree Bracket or color a tree like in the book. Then have them Facetime or make a phone call to people in their family. When you are doing this do not forget the side of the family who they might not be named after.  They can draw pictures of these people or add photos and write their names. You can also use casual family photos to reinforce relationships.

     

    Step 2:  Prepare your family members (your child’s aunt, uncle, grandparents or great-grand parents) ahead of time for a short interview via Facetime, Zoom or other video phone call. Ask them to recall a true short story or fact about something they used to do when they were young. Your child can ask them about themselves and then about their parents (where and when they were born, what their names are/were, what your mother/grandmother’s maiden name was, and so on). Keep notes on this so that you can create your family tree.

     

    Step 3: Interview other immediate family members such as your grandparents and possibly great-grandparents. Ask them to tell you what they remember about their parents and grandparents.

     

    Step 4: Talking with everyone listed so far should allow you to take your family tree back to at least your grandparents, if not your great, or great-great grandparents. The more family members you talk to, the more information you should be able to gather. Record this information and make a couple of rough drafts of your family tree before you make your final draft. Share your finished family tree with family members.

     

    Possible Variations:

    ·         Have them write a sentence about their conversation with a family member.

    Then take a picture/video of them reading their sentence and send it to me. 

    ·         Videotape your child explaining their Family Tree to a family member.

    Good morning,

    I hope this communication finds you all well, healthy, and safe; if you or your family are in need of anything, please reach out. 

    I really miss the students! I am sure they are missing their friends as well!

    You are an amazing parent/guardian for your child! You know your child better than anyone else. You know their stamina and strengths. If any of the details of the tasks that I have suggested are too difficult for your child, you can modify or even skip parts of the assignment so that your child has fun with language while they are at home. The most important part of this home activity is to continue working with language. I am a reading teacher, but we work on oral language such as speaking and listening as well as reading and writing. Each of those aspects are included in this lesson.  

    This lesson should last about a week, but if you enjoy it, feel free to extend it. If you can, work on this activity for 20-30 minutes every day. And, as I said, feel free to modify it. 

    Thank you for your patience during this trying time. We will get through this together,

    Mrs. Skoog 

    Theme Dinner

     

    Lesson Plan April 6 -10

    Who knew cooking was such a literary activity? Following a recipe to create a family meal is a great interactive activity to share with your child. While it is not something that you have the time or patience to do every day, cooking together is a practical, hands-on way for kids to:

    • Practice an important life skill.
    • Develop mathematical understanding (measuring ingredients, setting oven temperature, etc.).
    • Further their scientific knowledge (observing change).
    • Apply their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills.

    You can also encourage their natural creativity if you let your child choose a theme for the meal. And it gives them (and you) the opportunity to dress up for dinner! They can create signs and menus, print out or draw and label pictures.

    Here are a few ideas for themes, but feel free to create your own:

      • Summertime Picnic - Spread your blanket on your living room floor, dress in your summer brights, get out a basket and stuff it with colorful paper plates or melamine plates to create a beautiful summertime picnic on your living room floor. You can read and sing “The Ants Go Marching.”
      • Superhero Dinner - They can decide their superpowers! Have your child discuss why they chose that power. Try to get them to really expound upon their reasoning. Model creating a T chart and listing the positives and negatives of different powers. For example, “I want to fly,” can be changed to “I want to fly so that I could see everyone from up above like a bird, and I could get from place to place really quickly.”
      • Eating on an airplane (I got this idea from Tina Fey as she spoke about what she did to keep her kids busy during the quarantine) Her kids dressed up as flight attendants, drew pictures of windows with the earth below, and waited on their parents! They created menus and then wrote down their orders and served them. You can read “Planes Fly,” by George Ella Lyon.
      • Blind Dinner - My sister went to a Toronto restaurant this summer that was run by chefs who are blind. This restaurant is completely dark as you eat. Your other senses are heightened with this experience. In the actual restaurant, the servers do not tell the patrons what some of the food is, and they have to describe it using other senses. They also have to describe where the place settings like the cup and fork are. This would be a great time to practice using descriptive words and giving directions.

     

     

    Once the theme is developed, now is the time to start cooking! Encouraging literacy skill development as you cook together is easy when you allow it to flow naturally from what you're doing. So, rustle up your favorite kid-friendly recipes. Or you can order from a meal kit delivery company such as Hello Fresh or Blue Apron. 

     

    • Make a shopping list together

     

    Before you begin, name the items you'll need with your child. Independent writers can jot down a list for you and you can entice pre-readers with a paper and a pen, just like the ones you are using. Sit beside your little one as you write your shopping list, saying aloud what you are writing as you add each item to the list. Your child will be sure to imitate you and will learn an important purpose of writing in the process. Younger kids also enjoy ticking off the items from the list once you’re at the store.

     

    • Read the recipe together

     

    Recipes provide a wonderful introduction to instructional texts. Older children can read the ingredient list, gather the necessary ingredients, and read the recipe instructions aloud, step-by-step, as you go. Keep it simple for little ones. For example, “A recipe tells us what we need to make our cupcakes, and how to make them. It says we need flour, here’s the flour…” 

     

    • Taste the ingredients

     

    Sometimes when cooking together, I’ll ask my children or husband if they're brave enough for a blind taste test. To play, simply ask your child to cover her eyes and open her mouth. Then, offer a small taste of one of the ingredients you're cooking with and invite her to guess which it is. It’s a great way to get your kids talking about different categories of foods (spices, fruit, dairy product, etc.), as well as textures (smooth, lumpy, crunchy, etc.) and flavors (sweet, spicy, sour, salty, etc.) and it provides a physical connection between the senses and the descriptive words used.

     

    • Grow vocabulary

     

    There are so many interesting words to learn when cooking! Names of ingredients — cinnamon or saffron — as well as processes, such as whisking and dicing, measurements and temperatures. Hearing and seeing these words used within a real-life application, equips your child to better understand and remember the words and their meanings.

     

    • Encourage younger children to notice environmental print

     

    Environmental print is all around us. It’s the name given to print that appears on signs, labels and logos. Encouraging preschoolers and beginning readers to notice environmental print helps them to learn that reading involves not just letters and sounds but pictures and context too. Asking your three-year-old to find the cornflakes from among the cereal boxes in your pantry, or your six-year-old to find the all-purpose flour that sits next to the self-raising flour on the shelf, is inviting them to take notice of environmental print.

     

    • Read a story

     

    While the jelly sets or your cake bakes, why not sit together and enjoy a story related to food or the dish you are cooking? 

    Creating this fun evening might take an entire week to plan. Spread it out so that you enjoy each step, and remember communication comes in all different forms. 

     

     

     

     

    March 30th - April 3rd

    Good morning,

    I hope everyone in your family is healthy.

    I wish I could see your child during this time because I individualize lessons for them, and I do not want them to fall behind during this quarantine time. 

    You are an amazing parent/guardian for your child! You know your child better than anyone else. You know their stamina and strengths. If any of the details of the tasks that I have suggested are too difficult for your child, you can modify or even skip parts of the assignment so that your child has fun with language while they are at home. The most important part of this home activity is to continue working with language. I am a reading teacher, but we work on oral language such as speaking and listening as well as reading and writing. Each of those aspects are included in this lesson.  

    This lesson should last about a week, but if you enjoy it, feel free to extend it. If you can, work on this activity for 20-30 minutes every day. And, as I said, feel free to modify it. 

    Lesson Plan March 30th - April 3rd

    My Turn, Your Turn Story Time

    This is an old-fashioned storytelling time activity. It begins with a prompt from which one person starts telling a story and then at any moment hands the story off to the next person, who continues telling the story in his or her own way. This is repeated among the participating members until the story is finished.

    • Appropriate for all ages

    Directions:

    Step 1: The first person should begin telling a story based on the story prompt provided below.

    Step 2: When the story has reached a point that the first person feels is a good place for someone else to continue, he or she allows the next person to take over the storytelling, going in any direction of his or her choosing.

    Step 3: Continue this way until each person has had a chance to add to the story and someone comes up with an ending. An alternative to this oral interaction is to take turns writing the story down until it is complete.

    Step 4: Make up your own story prompts and repeat the activity.

    Sample Story Prompt:

    There was a boy named Hugo who loved school. He was very smart and loved to read. One rainy day, he was walking to school with his best friend Pearl when …

     

    Variation:

    * Tell your child a story before they go to bed, and then have them retell the story when they wake up. If they have difficulty, prompt them with clues such as, “The main character’s name began with the /h/ sound,” to remember the characters, setting, plot, solution and details. The story can be as simple or complex as they need it to recall the details the next day.

    **I would LOVE to see them share their stories if you would like to record them and send it to me via email!

    *** You may also have your child write the story down or create a sentence which summarizes the story. See how many details they can add to the sentence. For instance the sentence,  “The white seagull flew,” could be changed to “The white seagull dove down and scooped up a fish out of the lake.” I would LOVE to see your child read their sentence, so feel free to take a photo/video and send it to me via email. 

    ****You may also play the sentence puzzle game by cutting out each word and then letting your child put the sentence back together either in its original form, and then they may rearrange the structure if they choose to.  You may discuss how the new sentence structure changes the meaning. For instance, “The white fish dove down and scooped up a seagull out of the lake.”